Tag Archives: home-based business

How to Choose the Best Network Marketing Company

So, maybe you’ve read a previous article about network marketing and the companies that utilize direct sales as their marketing and distribution platform.  And, maybe (hopefully) you’ve taken the next step and reviewed Robert Kiyosaki’s video describing the type of person who will do best in network marketing.  If not, you may want to do that now.  Okay, now that we’re square on that, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty.

First, I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again:

Not all network marketing companies are created equal, in my opinion.

Second, they span across a multitude of industries.  As of today’s date, when I Google “network marketing companies”, there are 52,500,000 results!  Yes, that’s 52 million.

52,500,000 Network Marketing Results in Google

Now, in all fairness, it is Google, so it’s also likely that not ALL 52+ million results are actual companies.  Some of these results are likely network marketing haters and nay-sayers posting videos and articles bashing one company or another.  Still, there are a lot!  Agreed?

How do you even begin to find the right one for you??

Although I’m really going to hone in on the business-savvy and logical aspects of targeting the best network marketing companies, I also believe whole-heartedly that it’s vital to find one that’s aligned with you, your personality, and your passions.  Why?  Because it’s going to be difficult to do what you need to do if you’re dreading dumping yourself out of bed every morning and there’s nobody and nothing “there” to motivate you to do it – like a boss who you have to answer to if you’re late… again.

So, to begin with, I think it’s best to ask yourself what’s really important to you about a company you’re going to align yourself with.  Truthfully, this should be a consideration and thought process that takes place whether it’s network marketing or a traditional employment situation.  I mean, you can get just as burned out (if not moreso) at your j-o-b than working as an independent contractor in a network marketing situation.  If you’re in alignment, that’s less likely to happen.

Where do you begin paring down 52 million results, though?                        Man holding head leaning by question mark

Well, for me, some important things were:

  • transparency (in dealings, complaints, value, compensation, and so on)
  • a fairly wide open market (leaving plenty of room for growth in all directions)
  • stability (I think the stats are something like: 50% of all new companies – traditional or not – fail within the first five years and 50% of those remaining fail within the second five years)
  • leadership (both of the company and my sponsor)
  • consumable products (or at least those that I can see people paying a monthly subscription for)

When you start looking at these things, the list gets shortened pretty darn fast.  Believe me, though, I’m in no way trying to say that even with all these things in place a publicly-traded company – with all it’s “transparency”, years of operations, seemingly stable leadership, in-demand and barely tapped market, and needs-based products that are consumable – can’t dupe the American population.  They can and will – even with the government’s knowledge!  History has shown us that.  It’s no different than a traditional business, however – whether online or off – as we’ve witness by the dot-com bubble, real estate bubble, pending economic bubble, and the list goes on.  We’re just hedging our bets here.  Even with a traditional job, you can be hired this week and the business be insolvent in another one or two.  (This actually happened to a friend of mine.)

So, to further narrow down the search…  IF your list is similar to mine…  It may be wise to check into DSA (Direst Sales Association) registration, listings, complaints, and standing status.  See, the DSA only ranks about the top 200, I think, so you’ve now gone from 52 million to 200 with just this one criteria!  (For instance, the company I chose to align with is within the top 10, I believe, and is the only one in that range for its industry – health and wellness.)

New York Stock ExchangeWith this knowledge in hand, you should be able to wipe out the vast majority of even the DSA’s list of 200.

  • Find something you feel passionate about and can “get behind”
  • Check the DSA for stats, complaints, standings
  • Look at company performance on the NYSE

Next, are there any documented endorsement or testimonials.  Be sure you understand I said “documented”.  How come?  Because – especially with the use and ease of the internet – people can throw whatever they want up on a web site.  Again, using my company as an example:  Would you agree it’s pretty powerful to be able to tell people (customers and potential network marketers, alike) that the company’s products are endorsed by over 600 professional athletes – some of whom are Olympians??  I mean, those people are tested, right?  And they have to be in optimum physical condition.  Those things help in terms of customers wanting to do business with a company backed with that kind of confidence by people who use the very same products they’re considering using.  Plus, those building a home-based business within the company get the confidence of knowing that that very same confidence exists outside of themselves, their sponsor, or even the company president.

Then, the biggie:  earnings.  As discussed in a previous article, network marketing is a place where you can make no money, some money, or an Shiny Gold Dollar Signabsolute abundance of money… depending on your own focus, efforts, growth, etc.  The company’s statement of average earnings should be a great indicator if you’re serious about your business and know the income level you’re aiming for.  (Some people just want a little more money at the end of their month, and some want six and seven-figure earnings and beyond.)  Again, almost every company has at least a few who are or have been quite successful.  As is said in the industry, though:  “Those results are not typical.”  I’m the kind of person who (although I’m tend to be very optimistic) will always evaluate for worst-case scenario, knowing that everything above that is “gravy”… a “bonus”, if you will.  With that said, I look at a company’s average earning statements this way:  If I can accept the lowest amount on the statement for average earnings, then I’m pretty good with everything above that.  See, one of the companies I was a part of did have million-dollar earners… but the majority of people aligned with them made no money.  None.  Conversely, when I saw my current company was paying out an average part-time income of $25,000, that seemed reasonable to me.  (I supported my son and myself on less than that a few times during my 16 years as a single parent!)

And lastly, let’s look at the leadership.  This applies, in my opinion, to both the company and the sponsor.  (No, I don’t believe your sponsor directly determines your level of success.  One of the beauties of direct marketing is that your “boss” can be a total jerk, know less than you, etc., and you can still go on to earn more money than them!  I do believe having a great sponsor as a leader can dramatically reduce your learning curve, though — and thus, speed at which you achieve success.)  I’d suggest you really evaluate why the company was started, how it’s been developed, whether or not it’s aligned with your personal values (One of mine is philanthropy, so it was important for me to find a company that also “gives back” in proportion to its success.), and what their overall mission statement is.

Believe me, if you’re seriously considering a network marketing business for yourself and just spend a few hours on one day to go through these things on your own, I have no doubt you’ll find…

The absolute best network marketing company for you.

Your partner in success…

Crystal Schwindt

www.crystalschwindt.com






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The Top 5 Benefits of Network Marketing

If you’re contemplating applying to become involved in a network marketing company as your home-based business, you may be wondering whether or not it’s worth it. As a person has been and is working within the direct sales industry, I’d give you a resounding, “YES!”

Before I jump right into what I believe to be the top five benefits of network marketing, though, I’d like to make a point: There are people of both genders, many ethnicities, and all socio-economic statuses and walks of life who have found their way to network marketing. Initially, I believe we all come “here” for very personal reasons… to meet a self-defined need in our own lives.

For instance, my first introduction to the direct sales industry was with a very well-known cosmetic company. Many people (especially women) have heard of them. Anyway, I was in my early twenties then. I was also working full-time and going to college full-time, with a dual-major of Pre-Law and Business. Now, I worked for a company where I was actually making pretty darn good money for being that age. The challenge? I had NO time. No time to study. No time to be involved in hobby-like or outside interests. No time for a social life to speak of… not that I’ve really ever been too much of a social butterfly. I still knew I was trading time for money, and I’d already identified a strong entrepreneurial drive from within (at about the age of 19, when I made my first attempt at being self-employed with a non-direct sales business – just me, by myself).

So, a then-friend of mine convinced me to get involved. This venture didn’t work for me… but there was absolute value in it and the experience for me. Obviously! I mean, I later became involved in a network marketing company where I was fairly successful and recognized for over six years. Then with another that was really just one where the timing was good and the people and environment was what I needed at the time to move me forward and teach me some skills that I continue to utilize in my business today. (In fact, although I no longer consider that company to be “my” company, I remain associated, stay plugged-in to some of their training and with some of their top earners, and even refer people in their direction when I feel there’s a benefit there in terms of what that person is wanting to learn or may need as a person at that time.)

So, although I wholly support and acknowledge the existence of those more personal benefits, those aren’t the benefits I’m talking about today. The benefits I’m going to outline now are from a more mature, adult perspective – in terms of actual business… with the key personal elements being met.

1. Flexibility and the perceived freedom

Freedom created by a home-based businessYou’re technically classified as an independent contractor. (Funny how we accept that label in other companies and professions, but when it’s attached to network marketing, so many scoff.) This means you get to set your own hours. You work as much or as little as you like. Throughout the longer network marketing stint of my career life, I was a single parent. This flexibility allowed me to work around any schedule I needed so my child never had to go to daycare, was raised by me, and I didn’t miss out on all those “firsts” in his life that I wanted to be present for.

2. Earnings based upon merit and effort

This is good and bad for some people – which is also a very good reason why it’s NOT the best business option for some. Let’s be honest, some people just don’t want to work “that” hard. They’re “comfortable”, and they want to show up, punch a clock, and collect a paycheck. There’s nothing wrong with that. In fact, I’m super glad those kinds of people exist because society, as a whole, needs them in order to function properly. I, however, always No glass ceilings with a home-based businessfound it frustrating to have

(a) my pay based upon somebody else’s perception of my efforts and worth and

(b) an earnings ceiling that basically dictated that I could never rise above it unless somebody died or retired.

In network marketing, if you learn, grow, become who you need to become in your business of choice, you will, indeed, get paid in accordance with your efforts and growth as a person. If you fail to learn, grow, and implement, you’ll earn little to no income – and there are plenty who fall into this category, believe me.

3. Reduction in expenses and wasted time

Think about it, there’s no commuting… anywhere, really. Well, okay, depending upon the network marketing company you’ve chosen to become Expense reductions with a home-based businessinvolved with. Using today’s technology, however, I can truthfully tell you that I personally have no need to leave my house if I don’t want to – not for selling or interviewing those who are interested in working with me. I have no “home meetings”… or meetings anywhere else, for that matter. My interviews are conducted via telephone and video chat. The customers I serve have the ability to place orders directly with the company – online or by  phone, which means I don’t have to see them, handle product or inventory, deliver or ship anything, etc. Now, am I suggesting that I have to do nothing? Not at all. I’m saying that:

(a) I have a company that supports me and my customers very well (If a customer wants or needs to contact me with questions or concerns, they’re free and welcome to do so, and I’m happy to help them however I can.) and

(b) I have a vision for my business, so I’m also very selective about who I invite to work with me (Not “just anybody” will do, so leveraging technology reduces my wasted time with “no-shows”, whiners, complainers, tire-kickers, and so on – essentially, people who really aren’t “here” to win. I want to WIN!)

4. Low start-up cost

Other than real estate investing, I personally know of no other business or business opportunity that’s affordable for average people besides those available in network marketing. (Even zero-down real estate investing – for me, anyway, when I started – had expenses like gas, office supplies, postage, phone, and so on.) In contrast, direct sales business opportunities come in all levels of financial opt-ins. I’ve personally seen everything from as little as $20 to upwards of $3,000-$5,000. Still, in the scope of things, the high-end is a mere pittance in comparison to start-up capital for a traditional new business. Franchises are astronomical, and a stand-alone “mom ‘n pop” business usually requires so much that loans are needed just to get the doors open!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vkba_YOZORc&feature=youtu.be

5. Tax advantages*

For me, this is HUGE! Wealthy people will tell you… It really doesn’t take you having a whole lot of money to position yourself well in life (depending on the variables when you figure it out, right – like the number of years before you’d like to retire, eliminating bad debt, etc.). Plainly put:

It’s not so much about how much you make as it is about how much you’re able to keep.

A home-based business allows you to legitimately qualify for an array of tax deductions and such that are always out of reach as an employee.

Please understand… I’m a supporter of network marketing, entrepreneurship, and a free and capitalistic society that affords people the opportunity to do and become whatever and whomever they want and choose to be. These are just five of the top benefits that drew me into (and back into) network marketing. That said, I’d also be the first to tell you that although you’ll find all these benefits available in pretty much every network marketing opportunity, not all of these companies are created equal. You must be very real and honest with yourself about what it is you want to get out of your involvement… then do your due diligence in researching that company’s ability to deliver on whatever that is for you. If it’s not a good match for you, that’s okay. Again, all kinds of people fulfill all kinds of very valuable functions in society. If so, though, YOU may find yourself on the track to winning! So be honest…

Is network marketing for you?

Your partner in success,
Crystal Schwindt
www.crystalschwindt.com

*I’m not a CPA or financial advisor. These are my experiences and are not meant to serve as advice. Please consult an appropriate professional with questions you may have in this respect.

Is This a “Pyramid”?

What do people even mean when they ask that question?  Do they even know what they mean?  It’s seems to always be asked in reference to network marketing (aka direct sales) companies.  Personally, I think…

Network marketing gets a bad wrap

I’d honestly not given much thought or consideration to this question until recently – despite the fact that I’ve been involved in four network marketing companies (one currently, as a part of my overall wealth-building strategy) over the course of my adult life.  Just in the past few weeks, however, I’ve had two different people call my and my company’s integrity into question due to its utilization network marketing and my affiliation with it.  One… an 18 year old.  Another, surprisingly about 50ish.  So, I set off on some research of my own, and discovered some things.

  1. A “pyramid” is, in architecture, considered to be a very strong shape. (Think about the Egyptian pyramids, for instance.)
  2. Pretty much every company or business under the sun (unless it’s a single-owner, single-operator business) has a hierarchical structure of a “pyramid”. There’s a person at the top:  usually a CEO type.  Beneath that person are other supervisors, a Board of Directors, or other “management”.  Beneath those people are even more department managers.  Beneath those people are an even greater number of people who serve various functions.  And, the list goes on and on.  You get the idea.)
  3. Some of the most successful and notable business people on the planet find network marketing (aka direct sales) companies to be the best business model of this century for ambitious people, because, in a traditional model, you’ll never be able to earn more than the person “above” you, but in network marketing, you can – and plenty do.  (Disclaimer:  Some make no money, due to the fact that your income is a reflection of your personal efforts, business growth, leadership capabilities, and other factors.)
  4. Those same successful and wealthy business people find network marketing companies to be some of the best investment opportunities around. Why?  Because they’re very lean when it comes to expenses that usually wreak havoc in traditional businesses, like:  advertising expense, benefits, etc.
  5. Network marketing (via the independent contractor and home-business status) afford individuals the opportunity to create their own business for very little capital investment and then qualify for legitimate tax deductions they’d never otherwise be able to take advantage of.

So why are people so cynical about network marketing?

If I had to guess, I’d say it goes back to the beginning of the industry, as a whole.  I can see it this way, anyhow.

Shane Rudman, Network Marketing Icon
Shane Rudman

A very successful network marketing mentor that I once had the honor and privilege of working with once told me,  

As with many things, it’s common that the greatest asset can also be the weakest leak if not properly cared for and tended to.

What did he mean?  Well, in network marketing, people are the greatest asset – for sales and company prosperity and distribution.  Therefore, people can also be the weakest link —  and not even mean to be.  How?

As with any new venture, people are often very excited – as well they should be!  When we were kids, we had many dreams.  With age, society and those closest to us douse our dreams.  Not intentionally, per se, but nonetheless.  This means, when people are actually provided an outlet to dream again and find themselves in the company of others who are also once again seeing the possibilities of their dreams, a certain energy and synergy takes over and begins to grow.  This makes new people want to tell everybody “everything”.  Often the challenge is in the fact that they barely understand it themselves!  Inadvertantly, friends and family get bombarded, people who might otherwise be interested in the same business opportunity get misinformation, and, in general, I think people feel “duped”… and nobody likes feeling “duped”.  So, the nay-saying and network marketing-bashing ensues.  At least that’s what I think has happened – and, to some degree, continues to happen.

I also feel it’s quite plausible that those who are unsuccessful in network marketing leave their company, then go tell everybody they know what a “scam” it is… instead of accepting their own responsibility in that failure.  The fact of the matter is, in my experience, if you do your due diligence in aligning yourself with a solid business that’s transparent, it’s rarely the company or the company’s products that are the source of the person’s lack of success; it’s most often the lack of action, implementation, or tenacity on the part of the individual.  Now, before you get your drawers all in a bunch over that statement, let me also say that I’m in no way saying some people don’t suffer a lack of training or poor leadership or any of those sorts of things.  I’ve had the distinguished blessing to experience it all – good and bad.

I can honestly say that I really have nothing negative to say about the other network marketing companies I was involved in prior to my current alignment (a wealth-building vehicle and strategy, bear in mind).  And, in each of them… there are, were, and have been very successful individuals.  Perhaps, as I feel was the case with me, you simply have to find the right company for you and be willing to commit, allowing yourself to develop into the person you must become (mentally and academically) to achieve the level of success you seek.  It seems few people these days are willing to accept personal responsibility for who they are, where they are, the fact that they are who and where they are as a result of their own choices and decisions over time, etc.

Now, combine that scenario with the fact that there are obviously a lot of people who are ignorant about what a “pyramid scheme” actually is – or the fact that a true “pyramid scheme” is illegal… or the fact that there’s actually a regulatory agency (in the US anyway – Direct Sales Association) to monitor the companies who are its members – and you have people who (too young to even remember the birth of network marketing or “pyramid schemes”, as well as more than old enough that they could’ve educated themselves on the topic had they chosen to) simply walk around applying stereotypes and ignorant labels to everything they neither understand nor take the time to learn more about.

That said, I’ll be the first to tell you:  Network marketing is not the best business model for every person on the planet.  In fact, the video below by Robert Kiyosaki (a huge supporter of network marketing) leads one to believe there are far more people who it’s not for than those who it is.  Why?

Because you have to want to WIN to be successful in network marketing, and even though nearly everybody says they do, few will raise their hand, put their money-where-their-mouth-is and do what it takes to be successful… for a variety of reasons.

It would stand to reason, however, if successful business people and investors like Robert Kiyosaki, Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, and scores of others – with their vast knowledge base in business, people, and great achievements – are in support of network marketing, the least the rest of us could do is educate ourselves and stop “bashing” out of ignorance.

Your partner in success,

Crystal Schwindt

www.crystalschwindt.com

Passive Income vs. Residual Income

What’s the difference between passive income and residual income?

Many people don’t know… and it’s easy to understand why.  In some instances they can be interchangeable.  In other cases, not so much.  And, according to the IRS, not really at all — but that’s a topic for a whole other post.

Let’s see if we can make sense of this.

Passive income is monies derived from sources or investments that require no active participation on the part of the benefactor.  Most commonly, this is associated with things like rent.  It could also be pensions or other retirement payments, inheritances, and so forth.  The term passive income is also fairly synonymous with “unearned income”.

Residual income is monies derived from recurring sources that require the benefactor to only do the work once but receive payment again and again.  This could be everything from royalties on a song or book to sales of consumable products that create auto re-ordering to online membership sites to affiliate sales to network marketing.

In all fairness, there are times and in some circumstances where residual income really can and does become passive income in the sense that a sale is made and the residual, recurring payment from that one sale is now passive.  Does that make sense?

If asked, probably everybody would say they want passive income.  The picture below of Robert Kiyosaki’s Cashflow Quadrant illustrates the various sides and where (and how) you need to be positioned to capitalize on passive income.

Robert Kiyosaki's Cashflow Quadrant illustrates where passive income resides and how to get to it.

Learn more about passive income and the Cashflow Quadrant with Robert Kiyosaki’s book.

                     Cashflow Quadrant (EN - Paperback) by Robert Kiyosaki          Cashflow Quadrant (Spanish) by Robert Kiyosaki          Cashflow Quadrant (Kindle) by Robert Kiyosaki

Paperback                                  Spanish                                   Kindle

Improve your financial IQ… then grow your residual income into passive income.

Your partner in success…

Crystal Schwindt

www.crystalschwindt.com

          

How to Own a Job

DO YOU OWN A JOB?

Sounds like a silly question, right? Amazingly enough, most people who DO own a job don’t even realize it. So, let’s break it down and see if you do… and if you want to continue to.

See, you’d have thought that I, of all people on the planet, would’ve know… understood… the difference. Why? Because even though I remember my mom working a normal j-o-b for a while when I was in high school, both my bonus dad (aka step dad) and my real dad, well, I never remembered either of them working a regular job – like, as an employee. Now, in defense of one, I never developed a very close relationship with my real dad (another topic for another post lol), but I knew enough to know that he seemed to never work – not like I was used to seeing family members and friends work. Truthfully, not even as my bonus dad worked. And my bonus dad always had his own business, as far back as I could remember, so, to me, he was a business owner. It wasn’t until I was exposed to Robert Kiyosaki and his book Rich Dad, Poor Dad, containing the illustration of the Cashflow Quadrant and explanation of the four quadrants that it really made sense to me – AND allowed me to hone in on which quadrant I personally wanted to be in.

Quadrant #1: Employee

This is what we all seem to visualize when we hear talk of a “job”. You know the drill, right? For me, it started when I was 14 years old, but I think laws restrict that now, which is crazy in my mind. Anyway, at the age of 14 I wanted stuff, okay? Designer jeans, shoes, etc.  Cash Flow QuadrantStuff. And, my parents said, “No.” Really what they more fully said was, “It’s our job to provide your needs, not your every want. Jeans are jeans. There’s no reason to pay that kind of money for a pair of jeans. If you want them, you’ll have to earn your own money and get them.” I don’t know what they thought would happen, but… to work I went – and, yes, they had to then provide transportation for me. Lol (Later, as a guardian to my niece, I got to see what a friggin’ inconvenience and responsibility that can be!)

I talked to people. I put in applications. And, I landed a job bussing tables at a restaurant where my parents somehow knew the people who owned it or something. (Hhmmm… You think there was some behind-the-scenes negotiations going on there??) I was in heaven… sorta. I didn’t really like the work, and I didn’t really care for going to school, doing school work, then also going to a job – but I loved buying that first pair of ATB jeans! I’ll never forget it!

I punched a clock at a business somebody else owned, performed duties I was instructed to, and, in exchange, I received a paycheck. That, ladies and gentlemen, is an employee. Quadrant #1. This is where most working class people “live”. photo from rayhigdon.com

Quadrant #2: Self-Employed

Now, this was my bonus dad and (I thought) my real dad. (I learned later in life that this wasn’t the case. I’ll get to that in a minute.) I wasn’t stupid, afterall; I knew they weren’t employees.

As a business owner, you own the business. Duh! That also means that YOU do the work. YOU are self-employed. If a customer calls, you go. If work needs to be done on equipment,you either do it or call the repair person to do it. If there’s a complaint, you handle it. You take the calls, keep the books, send out invoices, make deposits, reconcile accounts, etc. The business doesn’t run without YOU, plain and simple! When you see “Bob’s Home Repairs”, this is usually Bob’s gig. (Occasionally, you’ll find a franchise or something that’s chosen a mom-n-pop name, but not as a norm.) The hole-in-the-wall pub or eatery… usually a self-employed business owner. The head bartender or cook is usually the owner. And, under most circumstances, may be the ONLYperson running the business.

What does that mean? Well, if he or she is sick, has a family emergency, wants to go watch the kids’ basketball game or piano recital, or anything else outside the realm of business, the business shuts down. No cashflow is coming in. This also means that money is being lost or potentially even “going out” when no money is “coming in”. Just think about vacations, right? I remember a few growing up but not many. Any guesses why?? You should be getting the picture about now, right?

YOU… OWN A JOB!

Quadrant #3: Business Owner

This is a little better than a self-employed person. Some would say quite a bit better. Given only these options, I’d tend to agree: THIS would be the “cream of the crop”!

A business owner is like a franchise owner or something like that. They usually still own the business, per se, but, more importantly, they own a system. And, they’re usually still involved in the operations in some way, some how. Where the “split” occurs, though, is in the fact that when a business owner takes off for the afternoon, the business still runs. The fam wants to go on vacay: Cashflow still happens. Money still comes in, and money still goes out. There’s a little more freedom in this quadrant. More responsibility? More headache? Well, the nay-sayers would argue that, and, I suppose, in some situations that could be true. My argument would be that they should’ve hired a higher quality of staff – ones they could trust, who possess impeccable work ethic, and who have the common sense when it’s alright to call and interrupt the vacay, if needed. Lol It’s usually a huge monetary investment… but the higher quality of life could be well worth it!

Quadrant #4: Investor

This is where the REAL freedom lies. Almost everybody WANTS to get here. Think about it: If you ask 10 people, who wouldn’t want a life of total freedom AND enough cashflow to do what they want, when they want, with whomever they want. Heck, I wanted that my entire life! Lol The challenge is that few people really understand this quadrant and even fewer ever get here. THIS is where my real dad “lived”, so I came to learn.

An investor is the epitome of what it means to have your money work for you. The people in this quadrant “worked hard”, make no mistake about it. People, for as many who scour the internet looking for the “get-rich-quick” schemes… I sincerely believe there are none. Are there ways to accelerate your success? Yes, absolutely! What are genuinely thought to be shortcuts, though? Nope. Don’t believe in them. There are a few reasons:

1. This quadrant requires knowledge… expertise… an understanding… personal growth…

2. Many people who already occupy this quadrant are unwilling to “give the goods away”.

So, if you’re interested in getting here… the place of passive, residual income… you must be realistic, tenacious, and willing to do whatever it takes for however long it takes to get you here. In other words, don’t ever give up. Learn, grow, ask questions, get mentors, try, fail, pick yourself back up, and keep doing it until you find the right vehicle, have become the person you need to be mentally and emotionally, honed your skills for the vehicle you’ve chosen, then make the leap to Quadrant #4.

My real dad… I still don’t know really how he did it. I mean, like, I don’t know the actual “moves”… and, he’s passed away now, so I’m unable to ask him. What I do know is that he began purchasing real estate. That was his biggest vehicle, I believe. Now, he also became involved in other things: funding business ventures for others; loaning personal capital; investing in material objects that he knew would appreciate in value over time; and, investing and reinvesting a portion of the cashflow to ensure the longevity of his life in this quadrant. He invested in things that generated income, right? Not things that cost him money. THIS is my chosen quadrant!

So let me ask you again…

DO YOU OWN A JOB?

Is that really where you want to be? If you’re in any other quadrant besides that of an investor, are you satisfied being there? Is that the destination you’ve always imagined your life’s journey taking you? If you answered “no” to any or all of these questions, I need to ask you one more… Well, maybe two… questions:

What are you going to do about it? And when?

Yesterday Past

Make the most of it.

~ Crystal

www.imfreeandrich.com

Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

Rich Dad’s Cashflow Quadrant by Robert Kiyosaki